This trail has been adopted by: Roland C. (What's this?)

Mississippi

Tuxachanie Hiking Trail

This 13 mile long trail traverses longleaf pine ridges, pitcher plant savannas, and flooded tupelo/bald cypress swamps.

photo: Trail covered in pine straw. Photo by Trey Cranford.

Length: 13.20 miles
Loop Trail? No
Type: Backcountry
Agency: USDA Forest Service
Entry Fee? No
Parking Fee? No

Allowed Uses:

Camping
Dogs - On leash
Pedestrian - Walking/Hiking/Running
Wildlife Observation

See more details.

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Location: DeSoto National Forest, In the DeSoto National Forest along SR 67, 10 mi. N of Gulfport.
State(s): Mississippi
Counties: Stone, Harrison
Longitude: -89.13358
Latitude: 30.66676

Driving Directions

The trailhead is located in Saucier on the east side of Interstate 49 (nearly across from Oak’s Package Store).

From Hattiesburg: Head 46 miles south on Hwy 49. Then turn right on to Glen Lott Road. Take the next left onto McHenry Ave/Old Hwy 49. Continue heading south for a mile, and then take a left on Pine Street. Take a left and head north on I-49. The trailhead is located on the right in less then a 1/2 mile.

From I-10 and the Gulf Coast: From Interstate 10, take exit 34B north towards Hattiesburg. Continue on Hwy 49 for 17 miles and the trailhead will be on the right.

Trailhead GPS Coordinates: N 30.666861 W 089.133482

Description

This 13 mile long trail traverses longleaf pine ridges, pitcher plant savannas, and flooded tupelo/bald cypress swamps. From rows of live oaks planted at the trail's entrance, the first five miles follow an old abandoned logging railroad which once served the sawmill of the Dantzler Lumber Company at Harrison. Remains of the railroad trestles, built by Irish immigrants in the early 1900's, can still be seen on some of the creek crossings. Note: this trail is designated for foot travel only except on a short section used in conjunction with the Big Foot Horse Tail.

Additional Details

Width: 30 inches.
Primary Surface: Soil
Secondary Surface: None
Average Grade: 2%
Maximum Grade: 25%
Elevation Low Point: 60
Elevation High Point: 300
Elevation Gain (cumulative): Not Available

Year Designated:
1979

Supporting Webpages and Documents

Map: USFS Map of the trail.
Map: USFS Map of the Bigfoot Horse Trail, which intersects the Tuxachanie several times.
Website: USFS Trail Details

Contact Information

For more information and current conditions, contact the trail manager (listed below). For questions, suggestions, and corrections to information listed on the website, contact American Trails.

Trail Management:
DeSoto National Forest
654 West Frontage Road
Wiggins, MS 39577
(601) 965-1600
[email protected]

 

Photos

Sign at entrance to Tuxachanie Hiking Trail. Photo by Woodlot/wiki.

Sign at entrance to Tuxachanie Hiking Trail. Photo by Woodlot/wiki.

Trail covered in pine straw. Photo by Trey Cranford.

Trail covered in pine straw. Photo by Trey Cranford.

 

Crossing a bridge along the Tuxachanie Trail on a bright sunny day. Photo by Trey Cranford.

Crossing a bridge along the Tuxachanie Trail on a bright sunny day. Photo by Trey Cranford.

A pretty sketchy bridge!. Photo by Trey Cranford.

A pretty sketchy bridge!. Photo by Trey Cranford.

 

Crossing a log over a huge puddle. Photo by Trey Cranford.

Crossing a log over a huge puddle. Photo by Trey Cranford.

Don't forget to enjoy the little things. Photo by Trey Cranford.

Don't forget to enjoy the little things. Photo by Trey Cranford.

 

Wooden bridge on the Tuxachanie. Photo by Trey Cranford.

Wooden bridge on the Tuxachanie. Photo by Trey Cranford.

Enjoying some campfire stories on a weekend camping trip. Photo by Trey Cranford.

Enjoying some campfire stories on a weekend camping trip. Photo by Trey Cranford.

 

2020 NRT Photo Contest Winner - Hiking and Walking. Photo by Trey Cranford.

2020 NRT Photo Contest Winner - Hiking and Walking. Photo by Trey Cranford.

Reviews

History and. Nature combination

The trail is well maintained and easy to find. It travels through several Ecosystems including some wet areas but allows you to keep your feet dry. Mostly flat but with some interesting ups and downs. We did the first three miles and plan to return for more.

March 5, 2018

 

 

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